A Fresh Cup is Mike Gunderloy's software development weblog, covering Ruby on Rails and whatever else I find interesting in the universe of software. I'm a full-time software developer: most of my time in recent years has been spent writing Rails, though I've dabbled in many other things and like most people who have been writing code for decades I can learn new stuff as needed.

Currently I'm employed as the Vice President of Engineering at Faria Education Group. If you're interested in working with me, we're often hiring smart developers. Drop me a comment if you're interested or email MikeG1 [at] larkfarm.com.

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A Fresh Cup

Notes on Rails and other development

Monday
Dec112006

Up and Running

So, after on and off effort for four days, I've managed to get this site up and running. Installing ozimodo and playing with Rails on a Ubuntu client was easy, and I'm impressed with my initial spelunking in Rails.

Deploying the solution to a Ubuntu server was a bitch. I persevered, and got through all the problems, but I definitely would have given up if this was my first computing experience. All the information I needed was somewhere, but some of it was in one place, some in another, bits and pieces were pulled from my own experience, and so on. It seems to me that there are some opportunities here to make this part of the deal easier.

Of course, opportunities don't necessarily equate to market opportunities.
Monday
Dec112006

Fixing rake remote:deploy

Shoveling Rails tipped me off as to why I couldn't connect to my spiffy new server - wrong openssl.
Monday
Dec112006

Online Rails API

Ruby on Rails API with comments and examples (via HappyCodr)
Monday
Dec112006

Install ruby gem termios on Ubuntu

This Google Groups post saved me. It certainly wasn't obvious to me what the problem was.
Monday
Dec112006

Rails vs. Ubuntu

I've tried a batch of Linux distros in the past. This time around I'm using Ubuntu; it seems to be well-designed to just work for most things. I'm also poking at Ruby on Rails. The two do not seem to be a perfect match in that the Ubuntu folks are not fond of the Ruby gems installer, and the Ruby packages in the Ubuntu universe aren't always the latest. Install Ruby Rails on Ubuntu Edgy Eft was a big help in getting a working client side combination going.