A Fresh Cup is Mike Gunderloy's software development weblog, covering Ruby on Rails and whatever else I find interesting in the universe of software. I'm a full-time software developer: most of my time in recent years has been spent writing Rails, though I've dabbled in many other things and like most people who have been writing code for decades I can learn new stuff as needed.

As of July 2016, I'm looking for my next job. I'm not able to relocate, so unless you're in the Evansville area, I'd need a completely remote gig. I have lots of experience working remote. Prefer full-time but I wouldn't be averse to an interesting contact gig. Drop me a comment if you've got something or email MikeG1 [at] larkfarm.com.

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Double Shot #424

Scraped up a bunch of links this weekend. Let's get to it:

  • Rails framework upgrades with git-bisect - An example of tracking down the commit that broke your application.

  • Native Google Chrome on Mac OS X: First Impressions - With a prebuilt binary you can download. It certainly is fast, though still unstable.

  • Rails Contributors (All time) - Who's got code in the framework? I like the "This year" view, personally.

  • 3, 2, 1... go! Your contact form is ready! - Quick contact forms for Rails applications.

  • Releasing the Source - The E text editor source is now available on github. License proliferation, though - ugh.

  • MySQL GUI Tools - Free administration & query browsing GUIs from MySQL themselves.

  • Benchmarking your Rails tests - How to do it.

  • Rails Template: Create a Twitter Application in Seconds - Just in case you need such a thing.

  • RubyMine Beta - I spent some time playing with this IDE on a reasonably large Rails project. It has some very slick stuff, including the debugger and a nice ERD view, but it's definitely unstable and slow at the moment.

  • Welcome to Rake - A basic guide to get started with.
  • Reader Comments (1)

    I used the Benchmarking your Rails tests and was able to find a single test that was taking over 30 seconds to run. Now I know which one is going to be thrown out into a different suite. Thanks.

    April 6, 2009 | Unregistered CommenterEric Davis

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